Science Fiction


Jay Armory, The Clouded World

Gollancz, 2008. 1st edition. Paperback. Contains part 3 and 4 of The Clouded World. In the air cities, where the Airborn live, civil war threatens.*

Kevin J. Anderson, Hidden Empire

The Saga of the Seven Suns, book 1

Earthlight, 2002. "Mankinds finds a device to transform gas giants into new suns. But are we wise enough to wield the power of the gods?" 1st edition. Paperback.

Kevin J. Anderson, Captain Nemo

Pocket Books, 2002. Further adventures of the character invented by Jules Verne. 1st edition. Hardback.

Poul Anderson, For Love and Glory

Tor, 2003. "Two archeologists discover on a planet an important artefact." 1st edition. Hardback.

Poul Anderson, The Enemy Stars

Coronet, 1979. 3rd printing. Paperback. A spaceship gets cought in the gravity of a dead star. Antiquarian: very good condition.

Neal Asher, The Skinner

Uncorrected book proof

Macmillan, 2002. "One of the most brutal of the alien Prador is about to pay the planet Spatterjay a surreptitious visit and major hell is about to errupt." Paperback.

Iain M. Banks, Surface Detail

Orbit, 2010. 1st edition. Paperback.

It begins in the realm of the Real, where matter still matters. It begins with a murder. And it will not end until the Culture has gone to war with death itself. Lededje Y'breq is one of the Intagliated, her marked body bearing witness to a family shame, her life belonging to a man whose lust for power is without limit. Prepared to risk everything for her freedom, her release, when it comes, is at a price, and to put things right she will need the help of the Culture. Benevolent, enlightened and almost infinitely resourceful though it may be, the Culture can only do so much for any individual. With the assistance of one of its most powerful - and arguably deranged - warships, Lededje finds herself heading into a combat zone not even sure which side the Culture is really on. A war - brutal, far-reaching - is already raging within the digital realms that store the souls of the dead, and it's about to erupt into reality. It started in the realm of the Real and that is where it will end. It will touch countless lives and affect entire civilizations, but at the centre of it all is a young woman whose need for revenge masks another motive altogether. *

Iain M. Banks, The Hydrogen Sonata

Orbit, 2012. Paperback.

The Scavenger species are circling. It is, truly, the End Days for the Gzilt civilization.

An ancient people, organized on military principles and yet almost perversely peaceful, the Gzilt helped set up the Culture ten thousand years earlier and were very nearly one of its founding societies, deciding not to join only at the last moment. Now they've made the collective decision to follow the well-trodden path of millions of other civilizations; they are going to Sublime, elevating themselves to a new and almost infinitely more rich and complex existence.

Amid preparations though, the Regimental High Command is destroyed. Lieutenant Commander (reserve) Vyr Cossont appears to have been involved, and she is now wanted - dead, not alive. Aided only by an ancient, reconditioned android and a suspicious Culture avatar, Cossont must complete her last mission given to her by the High Command. She must find the oldest person in the Culture, a man over nine thousand years old, who might have some idea what really happened all that time ago. It seems that the final days of the Gzilt civilization are likely to prove its most perilous.*

Max Barry, Jennifer Government

Advance reading copy

Doubleday, 2003. "In the near future the world is run by giant American corporations". Paperback.

Max Barry, Lexicon

Mulholland, 2013. 1st edition. Paperback.

Two years ago, something terrible was unleashed in an Australian mining town called Broken Hill. Thousands died. 

Few people know what really happened.

Emily Ruff is one of them. She belongs to an elite organisation of 'poets': masters of manipulation who use language to warp others to their will. She was one of their most promising recruits until she made a catastrophic mistake: she fell in love.*

Stephen Baxter, Resplendent

Destiny's Children 4

Gollancz, 2006. 1st edition. Paperback. Collection of short stories, all dealing with the everlasting battle with the Xeelee.

Greg Bear, Darwin's Radio

HarperCollins, 1999. The battle against a deadly virus. 1st edition. Hardback. Antiquarian: fine condition.

Greg Bear, Queen of Angels

Gollancz, 1990. 1st edition. Hardback. Antiquarian: very good condition.

"set in 2047, it explores a world of highly advanced, cybernetically enhanced personalities"*

Gregory Benford, Beyond Infinity

Warner Books, 2004. "Billions of years from now, the last true human must find her place -and her destiny- within the inconceivable vastness of multiple universes." 1st edition. Hardback.

Ben Bova, Kinsman

Futura, 1981. Paperback. An astronaut discovers that there is murder in space as well. Antiquarian: fine condition.

Chris Boyce, The Rig

Impulse Vol. 1, No.7

SF magazine, September 1966. Contains 6 short stories. 1st edition. Paperback. Antiquarian: very good condition.

Ray Bradbury Chronicles 2


NBM, 1992. Six short stories turned into comics. Signed by Ray Bradbury and the illustrators. 1st edition. Hardback.

John Brunner, Stand on Zanzibar

Gollancz, 2014. 1st edition thus. Paperback.

There are seven billion-plus humans crowding the surface of 21st-century Earth. It is an age of intelligent computers, mass-market psychedelic drugs, politics conducted by assassination, scientists who burn incense to appease volcanoes ... all the hysteria of a dangerously overcrowded world, portrayed in a dazzlingly inventive style.

Moving, sensory, impressionistic, as jagged as the times it portrays, this book is a real mind stretcher - and yet beautifully orchestrated to give a vivid picture of the whole.*

Algis Budrys, The Furious Future

Quartet, 1975. 1st edition thus. Paperback. Collection of short stories. Antiquarian: fine condition (stamps on flyleaf).

Algis Budrys, Who?

Penguin SF, 1964. 1st edition as paperback. Shawn Rogers, allied security chief, is to find out if the man behind the iron mask is the lost scientist or a Soviet plant. Antiquarian: very good condition.

Kenneth Calhoun, Black Moon

Hogarth, 2014. 1st edition. Paperback. Antiquarian: fine condition.

The world has stopped sleeping. Restless nights have grown into days of panic, delirium and, eventually, desperation. But few and far between, sleepers can still be found - a gift they quickly learn to hide. For those still with the ability to dream are about to enter a waking nightmare.*

Orson Scott Card, Shadow of the Giant

Tor, 2005. The follow-up of Ender's Shadow. 1st edition. Hardback.

Orson Scott Card (ed.), Future on Ice

Tor, 1998. Collection of short stories by various authors. 1st edition. Hardback. Antiquarian: fine condition.

John Christopher, The Death of Grass

Penguin Modern Classics, 2009. Paperback. With an introduction by Robert Macfarlane. The classic book from 1956 in which a virus causes a world-wide famine. Antiquarian: fine condition.*

Arthur C. Clarke and Stephen Baxter, Time's Eye

A Time Odyssey: book 1

Gollancz, 2004. Time-lines are mixed up, with dramatic consequences. 1st edition. Paperback.

Arthur C. Clarke and Stepen Baxter, Sunstorm

A Time Odyssey: book 2

Gollancz, 2005. "In five years time the sun will flare up and destroy Earth." 1st edition. Paperback.

Arthur C. Clarke and Stephen Baxter, Firstborn

A Time Odyssey 3

DelRey, 2007. Hardback.

Though supposedly the last volume of Clarke and Baxter's Time Odyssey series (after 2005's Sunstorm), this intriguing and frustrating installment of the high-octane space opera ends with an astounding cliffhanger just as humans have begun to confront the ancient and super-powerful Firstborn, who attack any species that might become a rival. Having barely survived a Firstborn-created solar flare, Earth now must cope with a meteor bomb approaching from deep space. Tensions rise between secretive, paranoid forces on Earth and equally suspicious groups among the Spacers, whose identification with humanity's home is waning. Meanwhile, in a pocket universe created by the Firstborn for some inscrutable purpose, slices from different Terran eons nervously adjust to each other. The narrative leaps about too much to develop characters, but Clarke has never been as interested in individuals as in humanity's ability to accept change as a species. It's too early to tell whether that theme will be enough to carry the story to a coherent conclusion.*

Eoin Colfer, And Another Thing...

The Hitch-hiker's Guide to the Galaxy 6

Hyperion, 2009. 1st edition. Paperback.

An Englishman’s continuing search through space and time for a decent cup of tea . . . Arthur Dent’s accidental association with that wholly remarkable book The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy has not been entirely without incident. Arthur has travelled the length, breadth and depth of known, and unknown, space. He has stumbled forwards and backwards through time. He has been blown up, reassembled, cruelly imprisoned, horribly released and colourfully insulted more than is strictly necessary. And, of course, he has comprehensively failed to grasp the meaning of life, the universe and everything. Arthur has, though, finally made it home to Earth. But that does not mean he has escaped his fate. For Arthur’s chances of getting his hands on a decent cuppa are evaporating along with the world’s oceans. Because no sooner has he arrived than he finds out that Earth is about to be blown up . . . again. And Another Thing . . . by Eoin Colfer is the rather unexpected, but very welcome, sixth instalment of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy trilogy. It features a pantheon of unemployed gods, everyone’s favourite renegade Galactic President, a lovestruck green alien, an irritating computer and at least one very large slab of cheese *

Michael G. Coney, Syzygy

Morley Book, 1973. 1st edition. Hardback. Once every 52 years the moons of Arcadia line up and creates havoc on the planet. Antiquarian: very good condition.

Arthur Byron Cover, Planetfall

A hilarious SF novel

Avon, 1988. 1st edition. Paperback. "Homer got lost. Really lost. Fortunately he was accompanied by his loyal robot Oliver and the ghost of his beloved robot Floyd." Antiquarian: fine condition.

Dan Dare, The Man from Nowhere

Pilot of the Future

Dragon Dreams, 1980. Hardback (no dustjacket issued). SF comic. Antiquarian: very good condition.*

Dan Dare, Rogue Planet

Pilot of the Future

Dragon Dreams, 1981. Hardback (no dustjacket issued). SF comic. Antiquarian: very good condition.*

Cory Doctorow, For the Win

Voyager, 2010. Uncorrected Proof. Paperback. Grade 10 Up Wei-dong, known to his Orange County family as Leonard, is addicted to guild game play with his Chinese colleagues. Mala and Yasmin, brilliant strategists, are gaming from an Internet cafe in the poor streets of Dharavi. Matthew and Lu are trying to establish their own freelance gold-farming operation in the rough city of Shenzhen. Guided from Singapore by the secretive Big Sister Nor, these young people are slowly coming together and forming a union to demand basic working conditions and protection from organized crime rackets. In order to prove their strength, these Webblies take over the three games owned by the Coca-Cola Company. Battling for real-world rights in a virtual environment, they must overcome corrupt cops, determined sys ops, and social indifference to beat the game. Doctorow is continually at the leading edge of electronic issues, rallying supporters to the causes of intellectual freedom, privacy, and social justice.

Diane Duane, Omnitopia Dawn

Daw, 2010. 1st edition. Hardback.

It's the first quarter of the twenty-first century, and "massively multiplayer" on-line games have been around for a couple of decades. In an increasingly wired and computer-friendly world they've become a form of entertainment so popular they're giving television and films a run for the money. And the most popular gaming universe of all is Omnitopia, created by genius programmer Dev Logan. *

Philip José Farmer, The Gate of Time

Orbit, 1977. Reprint. Paperback. "A red indian airman goes awol.. into a parallel universe". Antiquarian: very good condition.

Jaine Fenn, Principles of Angels

Gollancz, 2008. 1st edition. Paperback. Khesh City floats above the surface of the uninhabitable planet of Vellern. Topside, it's extravagant, opulent, luxurious; the Undertow is dark, twisted and dangerous. Khesh City is a place where nothing is forbidden - but it's also a democracy, of sorts, a democracy by assassination, policed by the Angels, the elite, state-sponsored killers who answer only to the Minister, their enigmatic master. Antquarian: fine condition.*

Jaine Fenn, Consorts of Heaven

Gollancz, 2009. 1st edition. Hardback.

The book is SF, but the first three-quarters take place in an almost fantasy setting. It is not a sequel to PRINCIPLES OF ANGELS, but it is set in the same universe and share the same villains, the Sidhe. When a naked, amnesiac stranger is found outside a remote highland village, he is taken in by Kerin, a widow whose unconventional ways are tolerated because her son Damaru is 'skytouched' - he appears simple, but he is able to affect matter. All skytouched are tested by the Beloved Daughter, the living goddess who rules the world from the City of Light. If he's found worthy, Damaru will become a Consort of the skymothers, the Gods of this world. Kerin and the stranger, nicknamed Sais, accompany Damaru to the City, in the company of a priest who's helping Sais to get back his missing past - but as Sais recovers his memory, he realises that the world does not work the way he assumed - and everyone believes - it does. Worse still, the hierarchy which has kept society stable for thousands of years is rotten to the core. Then Kerin and Sais uncover the true nature of the world, and the unimaginable fate of the Consorts - a fate Kerin will do anything to stop her son sharing. *

Robert Ferrigno, Prayers for the Assassin

Advance reader's edition

Scribner, 2006. "35 years in the future America is an Islamitic republic, at war with the bible belt." Paperback.

Alan Frank, Sci-Fi Now

10 Exciting Years of SF, from "2001" to "Star Wars" and "Close Encounters of the Third Kind".

Octopus, 1978. 1st edition. Paperback. Illustrated history of SF movies. Antiquarian: very good condition.

R.J. Frith, The Nemesis List

Tor, 2011. 1st edition. Paperback.

Humanity has expanded into the stars but at the price of its freedom. An autocratic and overbearing Government now rigidly controls every technical and scientific advancement. Deviation is punishable by death. Out on the edges of space, criminals thwart the law, making money out of illegal tech, their ships jumping from galaxy to galaxy to avoid detection. Ex-soldier Frank Pak doesn’t care about politics or breaking the law, he just wants to keep his ship running. When he’s offered a contract to escort a runaway back home to his loving family – he doesn’t ask questions. But his cargo is more dangerous than he realizes. Jeven Jones is no ordinary passenger. A result of illegal human experimentation, he’s a fast-tracked evolutionary leap into future. Thanks to his ability for perfect recall and a series of mental skills that he has no control over, Jones is a wanted man. The Government wants him dead. A fledgling revolution want to use him to unlock every advancement the Government has ever denied them. If Jones lives he’ll start a war. If he dies the entire future of humanity dies with him…*