In English

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Kenneth Sisam and JRR Tolkien, A Middle English Reader and Vocabulary (7/1)

Dover Publications, 2005. Reissue in its original format of Tolkien's first scientific publication from 1922. 1st edition thus. Paperback.*

The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien. A&U, 1981

Edited by Humphrey Carpenter, assisted by Christopher Tolkien. George Allen & Unwin, 1981. 1st edition. Hardback. Antiquarian: fine condition (no dustjacket).*

The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien. A&U, 1981

Edited by Humphrey Carpenter, assisted by Christopher Tolkien. George Allen & Unwin, 1981. 1st edition. Hardback. Antiquarian: fine condition (spine dustjacket faded).*

The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien. HoughtonMifflin, 1981

1st edition. Hardback. Antiquarian: very good condition (spine dustjacket faded, slight damage to the edges of the dustjacket).*

The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien. HoughtonMifflin, 2000

Paperback with a new, updated index. Photo of Tolkien on the cover.*

The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien. HarperCollins, 2006

Paperback with a new, updated index. On the cover a picture of Tolkien.*

The Reeve's Tale (1939)

"Chaucer as a Philologist" and "The Reeve's Tale" by J.R.R. Tolkien from 1931 and 1939, reprinted in Douglas A. Anderson (ed.), Tolkien Studies 5. West Virginia University Press, 2008. 1st edition. Hardback (no dustjacket issued).

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. 1925

1st edition!

At the Clarendon Press. Oxford, 1925. 1st edition. Hardback (no dustjacket). Spine rebound. Green linnen cover with gold lettering on the spine, axe on the cover. Includes the illustration and the errata slip. Tolkien's and E.V. Gordon's text edition of this Middle English poem. With many handwritten notes in the margins. Antiquarian: good condition.*

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. 1949

 

At the Clarendon Press. Oxford, 1949. 5th printing. Hardback. Green linnen cover with gold lettering on the spine, axe on the cover. Includes the illustration. Tolkien's and E.V. Gordon's text edition of this Middle English poem. Antiquarian: the book is in very good condition, the dusjtacket is good (browned, some small pieces op paper missing at the edges).*

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. 1963

 

At the Clarendon Press. Oxford, 1963. 9th printing. Hardback. Green linnen cover with gold lettering on the spine. Includes the illustration. Tolkien's and E.V. Gordon's text edition of this Middle English poem. Antiquarian: the book is in very good condition (some tape-residue on front en end flyleaf), the dusjtacket is good (browned, some small pieces op paper missing at the edges).*

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight/Pearl/Sir Orfeo. 1975

1st edition

George Allen & Unwin, 1975. 1st edition. Hardback. Antiquarian: very good condition (small knick on the side of the dustjacket).*

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, Sir Orfeo (1979)

Unwin Book, 1979. Paperback. 1st editon thus. Tolkien's translation of these Medieval poems. Antiquarian: very good condition.*

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, Sir Orfeo (1985)

Unwin Book, 1985. Tolkien's translation of these Medieval poems. Paperback. Antiquarian: very good condition.*

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, Sir Orfeo (1990)

Unwin Paperbacks, 1990. Tenth impression. Tolkien's translation of these Medieval poems. Paperback. Cover by Nicki Palin. Antiquarian: very good condition (owner's stamp on flyleaf, spine faded).*

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, Sir Orfeo. Ballantine

Tolkien's translation of this Medieval heroic poem. Paperback. Cover by Michael Dringenberg.*

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, Sir Orfeo (2006)

HarperCollins, 2006

Tolkien's translation of these Medieval poems. Paperback. Cover by John Howe.*

Finn and Hengist. The Fragment and the Episode (1998)

HarperCollins, 1998. 1st edition in this form. Paperback. Tolkien's translation and analyses of this heroic poem from the 5th century. Paperback. Cover by John Howe. Antiquarian: very good condition.*

Finn and Hengist. The Fragment and the Episode

HarperCollins, reprint. Tolkien's translation and analyses of this heroic poem from the 5th century. Paperback. Cover by John Howe.*

Ancrene Wisse

Early English Text Society. No. 249

Oxford University Press, 1962. 1st editon. Hardback (includes the transparant dustjacket). With two illustrations.

This is Tolkien's edition of the Ancrene Riwle, a thirteenth century manuscript known as MS. CCCC 402 or MS. Corpus Christi College Cambridge 402 - A Rule for Nunnes or Recluses - Ancrene Wisse.

Tolkien was formally engaged by the Early English Text Society in 1935 to edit the manuscript for publication, but owing to endless delays, it was not published until 1962. The bulk of the book consists of a line-by-line transcription of the text, along with extensive footnotes.

Antiquarian: fine condition.*

The Monster and the Critics and Other Essays (2007)

HarperCollins, 2007

Seven essays by Tolkien (on Beowulf, the English language, fairy tales and on his translation of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight). Paperback. Picture of Tolkien on the cover.*

Stuart Lee and Elizabeth Solokova, The Keys of Middle-earth

Discovering Medieval Literature through the Fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien

Palgrave, 2005. Episodes from The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings are compared with classical texts in Old- and Middle-English and Old-Norse and analysed. These texts are giving in the original language, with an English translation. 1st edition. Paperback.*

Tolkien: A Secret Vice

Tolkien on Invented Languages

HarperCollins, 2016. 1st edition. Hardback. Edited by Dimitra Fimi and Andrew Higgins.

J.R.R. Tolkien’s linguistic invention was a fundamental part of his artistic output, to the extent that later on in life he attributed the existence of his mythology to the desire to give his languages a home and peoples to speak them. As Tolkien puts it in ‘A Secret Vice’, ‘the making of language and mythology are related functions’’.

In the 1930s, Tolkien composed and delivered two lectures, in which he explored these two key elements of his sub-creative methodology. The second of these, the seminal Andrew Lang Lecture for 1938–9, ‘On Fairy-Stories’, which he delivered at the University of St Andrews in Scotland, is well known. But many years before, in 1931, Tolkien gave a talk to a literary society entitled ‘A Hobby for the Home’, where he unveiled for the first time to a listening public the art that he had both himself encountered and been involved with since his earliest childhood: ‘the construction of imaginary languages in full or outline for amusement’.

This talk would be edited by Christopher Tolkien for inclusion as ‘A Secret Vice’ in The Monsters and the Critics and Other Essays and serves as the principal exposition of Tolkien’s art of inventing languages. This new critical edition, which includes previously unpublished notes and drafts by Tolkien connected with the essay, including his ‘Essay on Phonetic Symbolism’, goes some way towards re-opening the debate on the importance of linguistic invention in Tolkien’s mythology and the role of imaginary languages in fantasy literature.*

Tolkien: A Secret Vice - signed

Tolkien on Invented Languages

HarperCollins, 2016. 1st edition. Hardback. Edited by Dimitra Fimi and Andrew Higgins. Signed by both on the first flyleaf.

J.R.R. Tolkien’s linguistic invention was a fundamental part of his artistic output, to the extent that later on in life he attributed the existence of his mythology to the desire to give his languages a home and peoples to speak them. As Tolkien puts it in ‘A Secret Vice’, ‘the making of language and mythology are related functions’’.

In the 1930s, Tolkien composed and delivered two lectures, in which he explored these two key elements of his sub-creative methodology. The second of these, the seminal Andrew Lang Lecture for 1938–9, ‘On Fairy-Stories’, which he delivered at the University of St Andrews in Scotland, is well known. But many years before, in 1931, Tolkien gave a talk to a literary society entitled ‘A Hobby for the Home’, where he unveiled for the first time to a listening public the art that he had both himself encountered and been involved with since his earliest childhood: ‘the construction of imaginary languages in full or outline for amusement’.

This talk would be edited by Christopher Tolkien for inclusion as ‘A Secret Vice’ in The Monsters and the Critics and Other Essays and serves as the principal exposition of Tolkien’s art of inventing languages. This new critical edition, which includes previously unpublished notes and drafts by Tolkien connected with the essay, including his ‘Essay on Phonetic Symbolism’, goes some way towards re-opening the debate on the importance of linguistic invention in Tolkien’s mythology and the role of imaginary languages in fantasy literature.*