!
!

Dinah Hazell, The Plants of Middle-earth

Botany and Sub-creation

Kent State, 2006. 1st edition. Hardback. "is unique in using botany as the focal point for examining the complex network of elements that comprise Tolkien's creation".  Illustrated with dozens of full-colour and b&w drawings of plants and trees.*

Rolland Hein, Christian Mythmakers: C.S. Lewis, Madeleine L'Engle, J.R.R. Tolkien, George MacDonald, G.K. Chesteron and others

Cornerstone, 2002

Second edition with an extra chapter on Dante. Paperback. "Explores how they influenced and inspired one another, and identifies the symbols and emblems in their works."*

Randal Helms, Tolkien's World (HoM)

Myth, Magic and Meaning

HoughtonMifflin, 1974. 1st edition. Hardback. Antiquarian: very good condition (spine faded).*

Randal Helms, Tolkien's World (Thames and Hudson)

Myth, Magic and Meaning

Thames and Hudson, 1975. Reprint. Hardback. A tree on the cover. Antiquarian: very good condition (spine faded).*

Randal Helms, Tolkien's World

Myth, Magic and Meaning

Granada, 1976. 1st edition thus. Pocket. Antiquarian: very good condition.*

Hexa 14: De Mijnen van Moria

Essays over JRR Tolkien

Antwerps, 1983. 1st edition. Papeback. Collection of four articles on Tolkien (all in Dutch). Illustrated by Chris Vandendriessche (also cover) and Marvano. Antiquarian: very good condition (spine faded).*

Deborah Higgens, Anglo-Saxon Community in Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings

Oloris, 2014. 1st edition. Paperback. Cover by Ted Nasmith.

Anglo-Saxon Community in J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings by Dr. Deborah A. Higgens, PhD will add to the field of Tolkien scholarship a detailed study of how Tolkien entered into the community of Anglo-Saxon storytellers as a scholar and critic, but also as an insider.

Embracing elements of a lifestyle he valued, yet which he viewed as diminishing in modern-day England and in the rest of the world, J.R.R. Tolkien hearkens back to a literary community shrouded in mystery and Faërie, from Beowulf and other Anglo-Saxon poetry to medieval legend. Tolkien enters that community both as a critic, examining lost elements of a heroic society, and as an insider, recasting, as did ancient authors, the elements of Story, to create his own great fairy-story.

While much has been written on medievalism in Tolkien’s works, this research adds to the field a detailed explanation of the Anglo-Saxon mindset in Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings (LOTR). In his sub-creation, Tolkien draws from the same Cauldron of Story from which the Anglo-Saxon poets drew, as illustrated by an examination of Tolkien’s two critical essays: “On Fairy-Stories” and “Beowulf: The Monsters and the Critics.” Tolkien discusses the manner in which the Beowulf poet created his poem, and it is evident that the same principles can be applied to demonstrate how Tolkien created his own great fairy-story as he integrates the ancient themes of the Anglo-Saxon mead hall, the lord as gift-giver, and the comitatus bond in his creation of the Rohirrim. In the role of the cup-bearer, Old English poetry predominately reflects aristocratic women, and Tolkien illustrates this aspect in LOTR through the characters of Galadriel and Éowyn. Tolkien’s work is as original as that of medieval authors because he built on ancient themes and structure, used their modes and genres, and chose similar mythic elements to weave his own tale. The decline of mead-hall society is reflected in Old English poetry, and Tolkien’s fiction embodies a sense of that loss, preserving for his audience, as did the Beowulf poet, this ancient society and its heroic values.*

Margaret Hiley, The Loss and the Silence

Aspects of Modernism in the Works of C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. To.lkien and Charles Williams

Walking Tree, 2011. 1st edition. Paperback. Cover by the author.

Traditionally, the "Inklings" C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien and Charles Williams have been seen as separate from the literature of their time: as innovative in an idiosyncratic way at best, and as reactionary and in deliberate opposition to contemporary progressive writing at worst. Recent years have seen a gradual change in this view, but few studies to date have attempted to read Lewis, Tolkien and Williams alongside their most famous contemporaries: the literary modernists.

This monograph represents the first full-length study to draw explicit and indepth comparisons between the Inklings and writers such as T.S. Eliot, W.B. Yeats, James Joyce, and David Jones among others. An examination of both thematic and structural concerns reveals a number of shared issues that go beyond mere responses to the cataclysmic events of the first half of the twentieth century. Myth as theme and structuring device, world-building as an attempt to render the author’s subjective reality objective and authoritative, writing as an (unsuccessful) attempt to overcome the nightmare of history, and language as both the paradoxical means of creation and the reason creation must fail: these concerns and tensions are central to the works of both Inklings and modernists. In establishing that the works of Lewis, Tolkien and Williams contain aspects that can be termed “modernist”, this study also hopes to show that certain aspects of modernism might very well be termed "fantastic". *

Mark T. Hooker, A Tolkienian Mathomium

A Collection of Articles about JRR Tolkien and His Legendarium

Llyfrawr, 2006. Many articles -some published before- mainly on translations of Tolkien's work. 1st edition. Paperback. Illustrated.*

Mark T. Hooker, The Hobbitonian Anthology

of articles about JRR Tolkien and his legendarium

Llyfrawr, 2009. 1st edition. Paperback. Illustrated. Signed by the author.

This is a second volume of articles by Mark T. Hooker that picks up where A Tolkienian Mathomium left off. Hooker's analysis is from a linguistic perspective similar to Tolkien's. "If you liked the last one, you're going to like this one," says the Foreword. Beyond Bree and Hither Shore said that there is "something [in A Tolkienian Mathomium] for everyone with even a passing interest in Tolkien. All of the articles are well researched, insightful, and highly informative." Tolkien Studies said that it is a "pleasantly eccentric volume ... Hooker has a wide variety of things to say that have not been heard before." Tolkien Collector's Guide said A Tolkienian Mathomium "is one of the most unique sets of essays on Tolkien I have read in the past 10 years." An early review by The Lord of the Rings Fanatics Plaza of the analysis of the origin of the name Tom Bombadil appearing in The Hobbitonian Anthology ranks it as "the best explanation yet of how the name Tom Bombadil came into being." *

Mark T. Hooker, The Tolkienaeum

Essays of JRR Tolkien and his Legendarium

Llyfrawr, 2014. 1st edition. Paperback. Illustrated. Signed by the author.

The essays range from Tolkien's probable literary sources, to his historical allusions; from his philological jests, to his serious linguistics.*

Mark T. Hooker, Tolkien Through Russian Eyes

Walking Tree, 2003

"Examines the sociological impact of the translation and publication of Tolkien’s works in post-Soviet Russia. Discusses the many competing translations in Russian and how they have adapted the books to the Russian mental climate." 1st edition. Paperback. Signed by the author.*

Mark T. Hooker, Tolkien and Welsh

Essays on JRR Tolkien's Use of Welsh in His Legendarium

Llyfrawr, 2012. 1st edition. Paperback. Illustrated. Signed by the author.

Tolkien and Welsh provides an overview of J.R.R.Tolkien's use of Welsh in his Legendarium, ranging from the obvious (Gwynfa), to the apparent (Took), to the veiled (Gerontius), to the hidden (Goldberry).

Though it is a book by a linguist, it was written for the non-linguist with the goal of making the topic accessible. The unavoidable jargon is explained in a glossary, and the narrative presents an overview of how Welsh influenced Tolkien's story line, as well as his synthetic languages Quenya and Sindarin.
The study is based on specific examples of attested names, placed in the context of their linguistic and cultural background, while highlighting the peculiar features of Welsh, "the senior language of the men of Britain" (MC 189), that Tolkien found so intriguing. It supplements, rather than competes with Carl Phelpstead’s excellent Tolkien and Wales, which sidestepped the topic of the Celtic linguistics behind Tolkien's work. Learn the story behind Lithe, Buckland, Anduin, and Baranduin.

Pagination: xxx + 274, B&W illustrations by James Dunning, maps, Index, Trade Paper

Jason Fisher--the editor of Tolkien and the Study of His Sources (McFarland, 2011), and the host of the blog 'Lingwë: Musings of a Fish' -- says:

Tolkien and Welsh "should be pretty accessible to most readers." Mark gets "into some of the particulars of Welsh (and Sindarin) phonology--especially on the matter of mutation, a prominent feature of both languages--but Mark writes primarily for the lay person." Where Carl Phelpstead's book Tolkien and Wales "presents a broad survey of the forest as a whole, Mark's book is down at the level of the trees within it, even single leaves, grappling with individual words and names. If you are familiar with his previous books, it is much like those, but with the driving thread being the influence of Welsh on Tolkien's nomenclature and storytelling. I think Mark's book and Carl's complement each other and could be profitably read together." *

Mark T. Hooker, Iter Tolkienensis

A Tolkiennymical Road Trip from Buckland (Worcestershire) to The Ivy Bush (Carmarthen, Wales)

Llyfrawr, 2016. 1st edition. Paperback. Illustrated. Signed by the author.

"a look at the meanings and stories of the place names that the route passes along the way, place names that might be translated or corruptions of those on the map of Middle-earth".*

Neil Isaacs and Rose Zimbardo (ed.), Tolkien and the Critics (1968)

Essays on JRR Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings

Notre Dame, 1968. 1st edition. Hardback. Collection of 15 essays on Tolkien, including "The Dethronement of Power" by C.S. Lewis, Edmund Fuller "The Lord of the Hobbits" and W.H. Auden "The Quest Hero". Antiquarian: very good condition (ex library copy. Sticker on spine dustjacket, notes in the margins).*

Neil Isaacs and Rose Zimbardo (ed.), Tolkien and the Critics (1969)

Essays on JRR Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings

Notre Dame, 1969. 1st edition as paperback. Collection of 15 essays on Tolkien, including "The Dethronement of Power" by C.S. Lewis, Edmund Fuller "The Lord of the Hobbits" and W.H. Auden "The Quest Hero". Antiquarian: very good condition (cover faded, notes in the margin).*

Kate Jones, Favourite Writers. Londen, 2000

Oversized paperback with short pieces, aimed at children, on popular authors, such as Terry Pratchett, J.K. Rowling and Roal Dahl. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis are also briefly discussed.

Leslie Ellen Jones, Myth and Middle-earth

Exploring the Legend Behind The Lord of the Rings

Cold Spring Harbor, 2002. 1st edition. Paperback.

Douglas Charles Kane, Arda Reconstructed

Lehigh University Press, 2009. 1st edition. Hardback. Illustrated.

In "Arda Reconstructed: The Creation of the Published Silmarillion", Douglas C. Kane reveals a tapestry woven by Christopher Tolkien from different portions of his father's work that is often quite mind-boggling, with inserts that seemed initially to have been editorial inventions shown to have come from some remote portion of Tolkien's vast body of work. He demonstrates how material that was written over the course of more than thirty years was merged together to create a single, coherent text. He also makes a frank appraisal of the material omitted by Christopher Tolkien (and in a couple of egregious cases the material invented by him) and how these omissions and insertions may have distorted his father's vision of what he considered - even more then "The Lord of the Rings" - to be his most important work. It is a fascinating portrait of a unique collaboration that reached beyond the grave.*

Clyde S. Kilby, A Well of Wonder

Essays on C.S. Lewis, JRR Tolkien, and the Inklings

Mount Tabor, 2016. 1st editon. Hardback. "offer brilliant introductions to the themes of the myth, theology, reason, and imagination that run through the fiction and prose from the renowned group of literary companions".*

Edouard J. Kloczko (ed.), Tolkien en France. Source Fantastique, 1998

Seven essays (like "L’épopée religieuse de J.R.R. Tolkien", "Smith of Wootton Major; un testament poétique" and "essai de microanalyse des Mewlips"), a bibiografie and a chronology. 1st edition. Paperback.

Paul H. Kocher, A Reader's Guide to The Silmarillion

Houghton Mifflin, 1980. 1st edition. Hardback. One of the first studies into The Silmarillion. Antiquarian: very good condition (spine slightly faded).*

Paul H. Kocher, Master of Middle-earth (HoM)

The Achievement of JRR Tolkien

HoughtonMifflin, 1972. 1st edition. Hardback. Photo of Tolkien on the cover. Antiquarian: very good condition*

Paul H. Kocher, Master of Middle-earth (Thames)

The Achievement of JRR Tolkien

Thames and Hudson, 1973. 1st edition. Hardback. Photo of Tolkien on the cover. Antiquarian: very good condition*

Paul H. Kocher, Master of Middle-earth

The Achievement of JRR Tolkien

Penguin, 1974. 1st edition as paperback. Photo of Tolkien on the cover. Antiquarian: very good condition*

Katie de Koster, Readings on J.R.R. Tolkien

San Diego, 2000

"This collection of abridged, previously published essays provides sophisticated analyses of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. The introductory essay presents solid biographical background on Tolkien. Tom Shippey's concluding essay, which identifies Tolkien's sources in developing Middle-earth, is perhaps the most useful in the collection. The editor also includes a thorough chronology of Tolkien's life, times, and work." 1st edition. Hardback (no dustjacket issued).

Katie de Koster, Readings on J.R.R. Tolkien (paperback)

San Diego, 2000

"This collection of abridged, previously published essays provides sophisticated analyses of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. The introductory essay presents solid biographical background on Tolkien. Tom Shippey's concluding essay, which identifies Tolkien's sources in developing Middle-earth, is perhaps the most useful in the collection. The editor also includes a thorough chronology of Tolkien's life, times, and work." 1st edition. Paperback.

Peter Kreeft, The Philosophy of Tolkien

The Worldview behind The Lord of the Rings

Ignatius, 2005. 1st edition. Paperback. `takes the reader on a voyage of discovery into the philosophical bones of Middle-earth.`*

Alex Lewis and Elizabeth Currie, Epic Realms of Tolkien 1

Beren and Lúthien

ADC, 2009. 1st edition. Paperback.

Lewis and Currie continue their ground-breaking studies with an examination of Tolkien’s most personal story, the Tale of Beren and Lúthien in its various forms. It is analysed from the early version in the Book of Lost Tales, through the incomparable poetry of the Lay of Leithian, through to beyond the Silmarillion version and the ideas that Tolkien was working towards the end of his life. The astonishing and powerful connections between Beren and Lúthien’s tale and the Arthurian legends in their various forms are examined and give a fascinating glimpse into the world of medieval literature which Professor Tolkien knew and loved so well. Find out how Tevildo Demon-Prince of Cats came into the tale and then was dropped in favour of other concepts, how Tolkien pondered over whether Beren should be a mortal man or an immortal elf. And throughout these tales run the foundations of Arthurian Story in a fascinating way. The connections that Lewis and Currie pursue lead to an elegant and original explanation of the creative purpose behind the Book of Lost Tales as a concept, and also give compelling insight as to how this related to the concept inherent within the Silmarillion and Tolkien’s Legendarium itself. In Epic Realms of Tolkien, learn also of the true significance of the Eriol / Aelfwine character and his adventures and deeds.

Lewis and Currie will continue their investigations into the links in Tolkien’s writings with the Arthurian tradition in Part Two.

lewis_forsaken_realm_tolkien

Alex Lewis and Elizabeth Currie, The Forsaken Realm of Tolkien

JRR Tolkien and the Medieval Tradition

"explores the earliest writings that formed part of Tolkien's invented mythology to look for the origins and the sources." Medea Publishing, 2005. 1st edition. Paperback. Signed by both autors.*

C.S. Lewis, Of This and Other Worlds

Collins, 1989. 3rd impression. Paperback. Edited by Walter Hooper. Essays by Lewis on literature, fantasy and SF. Includes his reviews of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. Antiquarian: very good condition.

Janice Liedl, The Hobbit and History

The unofficial movie tie-in to The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies

Wiley, 2014. 1st edition. Paperback.

The Hobbit and History uncovers the parallels between the Middle Ages and the intricate culture of Middle-earth that Tolkien created in The Hobbit, showing how historical cultures provided the models for Tolkien’s characters, foods, riddles, and battle tactics. The book explores how European myths and legends inspired Tolkien’s wizards, dragons, and the monsters he created. Seeing Middle-earth and its peoples against these historical backdrops shines new light on the richness of Tolkien’s world, which is rooted in knowledge of European cultures as deep as the archive that Gandalf explores in Minas Tirith.

Filled with fascinating facts and reproductions of Tolkien’s original artwork of Smaug and other aspects of Middle-earth, The Hobbit and History is the missing piece for every book and movie fan and anyone who thought their J.R.R. Tolkien collection was complete.*

Jared Lobdell (ed), A Tolkien Compass (1980)

 

Ballantine, 1980. 1st edition thus. Paperback. Eleven articles on Tolkien, plus Tolkien's "Guide to the Names in The Lord of the Rings". Cover by Darrell Sweet. Antiquarian: good condition (inscriptions on first flyleaf, damage to the cover).

Can hobbits be psychoanalyzed? Does Tolkien’s Christianity shine through his imitations of pagan legends? Do his books offer a useful guide to everyday life? These and many more questions are addressed in the eleven chapters of this book. Contributors analyze Gollum’s character transformation, the psychological journey of Bilbo, the regime set up by Saruman at the end of Lord of the Rings and its parallels to fascism, the books’ narrative technique, and Tolkien’s rich use of myth and symbol. This is an insightful book that will appeal to both old and new Tolkien fans.*

Jared Lobdell (ed), A Tolkien Compass (2003)

Second Edition

Open Court, 2003. 1st edition thus. Paperback. Ten articles on Tolkien, with a new foreword by Tom Shippey and a new postscript by Jared Lobdell.

Can hobbits be psychoanalyzed? Does Tolkien’s Christianity shine through his imitations of pagan legends? Do his books offer a useful guide to everyday life? These and many more questions are addressed in the eleven chapters of this book. Contributors analyze Gollum’s character transformation, the psychological journey of Bilbo, the regime set up by Saruman at the end of Lord of the Rings and its parallels to fascism, the books’ narrative technique, and Tolkien’s rich use of myth and symbol. This is an insightful book that will appeal to both old and new Tolkien fans.*

Jared Lobdell, The World of the Rings.

Language, Religion and Adventure in Tolkien

Chicago, 2004. Revised reissue of England and Always. 1st edition. Paperback. Cover by Ted Nasmith.*

In this detailed look at The Lord of the Rings, author Jared Lobdell examines J. R. R. Tolkien's methods and worldview by following the thread of three influences: the science of philology, Roman Catholic theology, and the Edwardian adventure story. Tolkien's knowledge of Germanic and Celtic languages helps explain his use of period linguistics as well as his skill at coining memorable names. The author explores the Christian/Catholic underpinnings of the Rings series, with emphasis on the question of whether the books are set before the Fall of Man. This fascinating look at Tolkien's creative process is a must-have for all Lord of the Rings and Tolkien fans.

Jared Lobdell, The Rise of Tolkienian Fantasy

Open Court, 2005. "traces Tolkien's most important precursors and influences. Some are familiar figures: Rudyard Kipling, William Morris, Kenneth Grahame and H. Rider Haggard. Others, such as R.S. Surtees and George MacDonald, have been neglected lately. Finally, Lobdell looks at some of the ablest heirs of the master: Ursula Le Guin, Stephen King and J.K. Rowling". 1st edition. Paperback.*

Emilia Lodigiani, Invito alla lettura di Tolkien

Mursia, 1982. 1st edition. Paperback. Introduction to Tolkien in Italian. Antiquarian: very good condition.*

Helen M. Luke, The Laughter at the Heart of Things

New York, 2001. 1st edition. Hardback. A collection of articles, including one on Wagner and Tolkien.

Louis Markos, On the Shoulders of Hobbits

The Road to Virtue with Tolkien and Lewis

Chicago, 2012. Paperback.

On The Shoulders Of Hobbits is a pleasant and often inspirational look at the role of Virtue in the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis. Louis Markos, a professor at Houston Baptist University, has done a fine job of describing the classical and theological virtues as they are depicted in The Lord of the Rings and The Chronicles of Narnia. He writes as an admirer of both authors, a well educated and thoughtful man, and a deeply believing Christian.*

Richard Mathews, Lightning from a Clear Sky

Tolkien, The Trilogy, and The Silmarillion

Borgo Press, 1978. 1st edition. Paperback. "examines the entire span of Tolkien's fiction". Antiquarian: very good condition.*