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Letters from Father Christmas. HarC, 2009

HarperCollins, 2009. 1st edition in this form. Paperback. Illustrated in colour by Tolkien.

The first ever B-format edition of Tolkien’s complete Father Christmas letters, including a new introduction and rare archive materials.*

Letters from Father Christmas. HarC, 2015

HarperCollins, 2015. Hardback. Illustrated in colour by Tolkien.

The first ever B-format edition of Tolkien’s complete Father Christmas letters, including a new introduction and rare archive materials.*

Roverandom. HoughtonMifflin, 1998

Hardback. Illustrated by Tolkien with three watercolours and two drawings. Tolkien wrote this story about a dog that went to the moon in 1925. With an introduction by Christina Scull and Wayne Hammond.*

Roverandom. HarperCollins, 1998

Hardback. Illustrated by Tolkien with three watercolours and two drawings. Tolkien wrote this story about a dog that went to the moon in 1925. With an introduction by Christina Scull and Wayne Hammond.*

Roverandom. HoughtonMifflin, 1998. Paperback

Paperback. Illustrated by Tolkien with three watercolours and two drawings. Tolkien wrote this story about a dog that went to the moon in 1925. With an introduction by Christina Scull and Wayne Hammond.*

Roverandom. HarperCollins, 2002. Paperback

Paperback. Illustrated by Tolkien with three watercolours and two drawings. Tolkien wrote this story about a dog that went to the moon in 1925. With an introduction by Christina Scull and Wayne Hammond.*

Roverandom. HarC, 2013

HarperCollins, 2013. Hardback. Illustrated in colour by Tolkien.

J.R.R. Tolkien’s fantasy story about the adventures of a bewitched toy dog, written before The Hobbit.

While on holiday in 1925, four-year-old Michael Tolkien lost his beloved toy dog on the beach at Filey in Yorkshire. To console him, his father, J.R.R.Tolkien, improvised a story about Rover, a real dog who is magically transformed into a toy and is forced to seek out the wizard who wronged him in order to be returned to normal.

This charming tale, peopled by a sand-sorcerer and a terrible dragon, by the king of the sea and the Man-in-the-Moon, was Tolkien’s first full-length children’s book, written before The Hobbit. Now, nearly 90 years later, the adventures of Rover – or, for reasons that become clear in the story, ‘Roverandom’ – are published in this delightful pocket hardback edition. Rich in wit and wordplay, Roverandom is edited and introduced by Tolkien experts Christina Scull and Wayne G. Hammond, and includes Tolkien’s own delightful illustrations.*

The Adventures of Tom Bombadil. HarC, 2014

HarperCollins, 2014. Hardback. Illustrated.

This revised and expanded edition of Tolkien’s own Hobbit-inspired poetry includes previously unpublished poems and notes, and is beautifully illustrated by Narnia artist Pauline Baynes.

This special edition has been expanded to include earlier versions of some of Tolkien’s poems, a fragment of a prose story with Tom Bombadil, and comprehensive notes by acclaimed Tolkien scholars Christina Scull and Wayne G. Hammond.*

The Tolkien Treasruy. HarC, 2015

HarperCollins, 2015. Set of four small hardbacks with Roverandom, Farmer Giles of Ham, Smith of Wootton Major and The Adventures of Tom Bombadil. In a slipcase. Illustrated.*

"Cat" in The Poetical Cat. New York, 1995

This poem by Tolkien from The Adventures of Tom Bombadil is included in Felicity Bast (red.), The Poetical Cat. An Anthology. In total 90 poems about cats, illustrated in b&w by Robert Clyde Anderson. Hardback (no dustjacket issued). 1st printing.

Poems and Stories De Luxe. A&U, 1980

George Allen & Unwin, 1980. 1st edition. Hardback (no dustjacket issued) in a box. Cover by Tolkien. Colour and b&w illustrations by Pauline Baynes. Contains: The Adventures of Tom Bombadil, The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth, On Fairy-Stories, Leaf by Niggle, Farmer Giles of Ham, Smith of Wootton Major. Antiquarian: fine condition (one corner of the box split).*

Poems and Stories. HoM, 1994

HoughtonMifflin, 1994. 1st edition. Hardback. Cover by Alan Lee. B&w illustrations by Pauline Baynes. Contains: The Adventures of Tom Bombadil, The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth, On Fairy-Stories, Leaf by Niggle, Farmer Giles of Ham, Smith of Wootton Major. Antiquarian: very good condition (tear in dustjacket, stamp on flyleaf).*

The Tolkien Reader. Ballantine, 1973

 

Pocket containing The Adventures of Tom Bombadil, Farmer Giles of Ham, Tree and Leaf, The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth and Peter Beagle's article "Tolkien's Magic Ring". Cover and illustrations by Pauline Baynes. Antiquarian: good condition.*

The Tolkien Reader. Ballantine, 2004

Pocket containing The Adventures of Tom Bombadil, Farmer Giles of Ham, Tree and Leaf, The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth and Peter Beagle's article "Tolkien's Magic Ring". Cover by Michael Dringenberg. Illustrations by Pauline Baynes.*

The Tolkien Reader, Unfinished Tales, The Silmarillion, Sir Gawain

Ballantine

Decorated slipcase with the pocket editions of Unfinished Tales, The Tolkien Reader, The Silmarillion and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Covers by Michael Dringenberg.*

Tales from the Perilous Realm - de luxe edition, signed

HarperCollins, 2008. 1st edition. Hardback.

This de luxe collector's edition includes the first edition text and features an exclusive colour frontispiece illustration on a fold-out sheet. The book is quarterbound, with a specially commissioned motif stamped in three foils on the front board, and is presented in a matching slipcase. signed by Alan Lee on the title page.*

Tales from the Perilous Realm. HoM, 2008

HoughtonMifflin, 2008. Hardback. Contains Roverandom, Farmer Giles of Ham, Leaf by Niggle, The Adventures of Tom Bombadil and Smith of Wootton Major. With an introduction by Tom Shippey and an afterword by Alan Lee. Cover and illustrations by Alan Lee.*

Tales from the Perilous Realm. HarperCollins, 2009

HarperCollins, 2009. Paperback. Contains Roverandom, Farmer Giles of Ham, Leaf by Niggle, The Adventures of Tom Bombadil and Smith of Wootton Major. With an introduction by Tom Shippey and an afterword by Alan Lee. Cover and illustrations by Alan Lee.*

The Road Goes Ever On. A Song Cycle. 1969

George Allen & Unwin, 1969

First edition. The songcycle from Donald Swann. Text and calligraphy by Tolkien. Seven poems by Tolkien, set to music byr Donald Swann: "The Road Goes Ever On", "Upon the Hearth the Fire is Hot", "In the Willow-meads of Tasarinan", "In Western Lands", "Namárië", "I Sit Beside the Fire", "Errantry". Antiquarian: fine condition (dustjacket has a small tear at the top of the spine).*

The Road Goes Ever On. A Song Cycle. 1974

George Allen & Unwin, 1974

Fourth impression. The songcycle from Donald Swann. Text and calligraphy by Tolkien. Seven poems by Tolkien, set to music byr Donald Swann: "The Road Goes Ever On", "Upon the Hearth the Fire is Hot", "In the Willow-meads of Tasarinan", "In Western Lands", "Namárië", "I Sit Beside the Fire", "Errantry". Antiquarian: very good condition (dustjacket has a tear at the top of the spine, the spine itself has a crack in it).*

The Road Goes Ever On. Second Edition

George Allen & Unwin, 1978. Second edition. The songcycle from Donald Swann. Text and calligraphy by Tolkien. This second edition added "Bilbo's Last Song", not in the first edition. Antiquarian: fine condition (dustjacket has a small tear at the back of the spine, but otherwise very crisp and clean).*

The Road Goes Ever On. With cd (22/11)

HarperCollins, 2002. 1st edition. Hardback. Nine poems by Tolkien, set to music byr Donald Swann: "The Road Goes Ever On", "Upon the Hearth the Fire is Hot", "In the Willow-meads of Tasarinan", "In Western Lands", "Namárië", "I Sit Beside the Fire", "Errantry", "Bilbo's Last Song" and "Lúthien Tinúviel". Illuminated with Elven calligraphy by Tolkien. With a cd on which the bariton William Elvin sings seven of the songs. Antiquarian: fine condition.*

Mr. Bliss. A&U, 1982

 

George Allen & Unwin, 1982. 1st edition. Hardback. Contains the handwritten manuscript with colour illustrations by Tolkien. Antiquarian: fine condition.*

Mr. Bliss. HarperColins, 1994

 

Hardback. Contains the handwritten manuscript with colour illustrations by Tolkien. Antiquarian: fine condition.*

Mr. Bliss Facsimile Edition

HarperCollins, 2007. 1st edition in this form. Hardback (no dustjacket issued) in slipcase.

A brand new edition of the long unavailable children's story, written and illustrated by the author of The Hobbit and Letters from father Christmas, with newly scanned manuscript pages and redesigned text. Professor J.R.R. Tolkien invented and illustrated the book of Mr Bliss's adventures for his own children when they were very young.

The story is reproduced here exactly as he created it -- handwritten with lots of detailed and uproarious colour pictures. This is a complete and highly imaginative tale of eccentricity. Mr Bliss, a man notable for his immensely tall hats and for the girabbit in his garden, takes the whimsical decision to buy a motor car.

But his first drive to visit friends quickly becomes a catalogue of disasters. Some of these could be blamed on Mr Bliss's style of driving, but even he could not anticipate being hijacked by three bears. As for what happened next -- the readers, whether young or old, will want to discover for themselves.

Thankfully all ended well, and even the yellow motor car with red wheels (to which Mr Bliss has taken an understandable and great dislike), came in useful at the end!*

Mr. Bliss. HarC, 2011

HarperCollins, 2011. 1st edition thus. Hardback. Illustrated.

The first ever trade edition of Tolkien’s illustrated tale about the eccentric Mr Bliss, a man notable for his immensely tall hats and for the girabbit in his garden, whose whimsical decision to buy a motor car quickly becomes a catalogue of disasters.

Professor J.R.R. Tolkien invented and illustrated the book of Mr Bliss’s adventures for his own children when they were very young. The book was handwritten with lots of detailed and uproarious colour pictures.

This is a complete and highly imaginative tale of eccentricity. Mr Bliss, a man notable for his immensely tall hats and for the girabbit in his garden, takes the whimsical decision to buy a motor car. But his first drive to visit friends quickly becomes a catalogue of disasters. Some of these could be blamed on Mr Bliss’s style of driving, but even he could not anticipate being hijacked by three bears. As for what happened next – the readers, whether young or old, will want to discover for themselves.

Redesigned using new archival scans of Tolkien’s original drawings, MR BLISS is presented for the first time in a conventional trade format.*

Hilary Tolkien, Black & White Ogre Country

The Lost Tales of Hilary Tolkien

ADC Publications Ltd, Moreton in Marsh, 2009. Hardback. First Edition. Beautiful collection of short stories from a recently discovered notebook / scrapbook of Hilary Tolkien describing the childhhood adventures of himself and his brother JRR Tolkien. 80 pages including wonderful colour illustrations by Jef Murray. A must have for Tolkien fans, helps complete the biography, contains previously unseen extracts from letters by JRR Tolkien, his father, photo's of the brothers and family etc. Expertly and emotionally edited by Angela Gardner.*

Hilary Tolkien, Black & White Ogre Country - signed

The Lost Tales of Hilary Tolkien

ADC Publications Ltd, Moreton in Marsh, 2009. Hardback. First Edition. Beautiful collection of short stories from a recently discovered notebook / scrapbook of Hilary Tolkien describing the childhhood adventures of himself and his brother JRR Tolkien. 80 pages including wonderful colour illustrations by Jef Murray. A must have for Tolkien fans, helps complete the biography, contains previously unseen extracts from letters by JRR Tolkien, his father, photo's of the brothers and family etc. Expertly and emotionally edited by Angela Gardner.

Signed on the title page by editor Angela Gardner and illustrator Jef Murray.*

Hilary Tolkien, Black & White Ogre Country. Limited edition

The Lost Tales of Hilary Tolkien

ADC Publications Ltd, Moreton in Marsh, 2009. Hardback. First Edition. Beautiful collection of short stories from a recently discovered notebook / scrapbook of Hilary Tolkien describing the childhhood adventures of himself and his brother JRR Tolkien. 80 pages including wonderful colour illustrations by Jef Murray. A must have for Tolkien fans, helps complete the biography, contains previously unseen extracts from letters by JRR Tolkien, his father, photo's of the brothers and family etc. Expertly and emotionally edited by Angela Gardner.

Slipcased edition, limited to 100 numbered copies. Signed by the Angela Gardner, Jef Murray and Chris Tolkien (Hillary's grandson).*

The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún - signed deluxe

HarperCollins, 2009. 1st edition. Hardback in box. Features a colour frontispiece of a facsimile page from the original manuscript. Bound in brown leather, stamped in gold foil with a unique motif of Sigurd's horse.Signed by Christopher Tolkien. Limited to 500 copies. This is number 65. In it original mailer as well.*

The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún - deluxe

HarperCollins, 2009. 1st edition. Hardback in slipcase. Features a colour frontispiece of a facsimile page from the original manuscript. Quarter-bound in brown leather with grey boards, stamped in gold foil with a unique motif of Sigurd's horse.*

The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun (UK)

 

HarperCollins, 2009. 1st edition. Hardback. The world first publication of a previously unknown work by J.R.R. Tolkien, which tells the epic story of the Norse hero, Sigurd, the dragon-slayer, the revenge of Gudrun, and the Fall of the Nibelungs.*

The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun (US)

 

HoughtonMifflin, 2009. 1st edition. Hardback. The world first publication of a previously unknown work by J.R.R. Tolkien, which tells the epic story of the Norse hero, Sigurd, the dragon-slayer, the revenge of Gudrun, and the Fall of the Nibelungs.*

The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún. Paperback

HarperCollins, 2010. 1st edition. Paperback.*

The Fall of Arthur

HarperCollins, 2013. 1st edition. Hardback. Illustrated. The world first publication of a previously unknown work by J.R.R. Tolkien, which tells the extraordinary story of the final days of England's legendary hero, King Arthur.

The Fall of Arthur, the only venture by J.R.R. Tolkien into the legends of Arthur King of Britain, may well be regarded as his finest and most skilful achievement in the use of the Old English alliterative metre, in which he brought to his transforming perceptions of the old narratives a pervasive sense of the grave and fateful nature of all that is told: of Arthur's expedition overseas into distant heathen lands, of Guinevere's flight from Camelot, of the great sea-battle on Arthur's return to Britain, in the portrait of the traitor Mordred, in the tormented doubts of Lancelot in his French castle. Unhappily, The Fall of Arthur was one of several long narrative poems that he abandoned in that period. In this case he evidently began it in the earlier nineteen-thirties, and it was sufficiently advanced for him to send it to a very perceptive friend who read it with great enthusiasm at the end of 1934 and urgently pressed him 'You simply must finish it!' But in vain: he abandoned it, at some date unknown, though there is some evidence that it may have been in 1937, the year of the publication of The Hobbit and the first stirrings of The Lord of the Rings. Years later, in a letter of 1955, he said that 'he hoped to finish a long poem on The Fall of Arthur'; but that day never came. Associated with the text of the poem, however, are many manuscript pages: a great quantity of drafting and experimentation in verse, in which the strange evolution of the poem’s structure is revealed, together with narrative synopses and very significant if tantalising notes. In these latter can be discerned clear if mysterious associations of the Arthurian conclusion with The Silmarillion, and the bitter ending of the love of Lancelot and Guinevere, which was never written.*

The Fall of Arthur - de luxe edition

HarperCollins, 2013. 1st edition. Hardback. Illustrated. Quarterbound in leather. In a slipcase.

The world first publication of a previously unknown work by J.R.R. Tolkien, which tells the extraordinary story of the final days of England's legendary hero, King Arthur.

The Fall of Arthur, the only venture by J.R.R. Tolkien into the legends of Arthur King of Britain, may well be regarded as his finest and most skilful achievement in the use of the Old English alliterative metre, in which he brought to his transforming perceptions of the old narratives a pervasive sense of the grave and fateful nature of all that is told: of Arthur's expedition overseas into distant heathen lands, of Guinevere's flight from Camelot, of the great sea-battle on Arthur's return to Britain, in the portrait of the traitor Mordred, in the tormented doubts of Lancelot in his French castle. Unhappily, The Fall of Arthur was one of several long narrative poems that he abandoned in that period. In this case he evidently began it in the earlier nineteen-thirties, and it was sufficiently advanced for him to send it to a very perceptive friend who read it with great enthusiasm at the end of 1934 and urgently pressed him 'You simply must finish it!' But in vain: he abandoned it, at some date unknown, though there is some evidence that it may have been in 1937, the year of the publication of The Hobbit and the first stirrings of The Lord of the Rings. Years later, in a letter of 1955, he said that 'he hoped to finish a long poem on The Fall of Arthur'; but that day never came. Associated with the text of the poem, however, are many manuscript pages: a great quantity of drafting and experimentation in verse, in which the strange evolution of the poem’s structure is revealed, together with narrative synopses and very significant if tantalising notes. In these latter can be discerned clear if mysterious associations of the Arthurian conclusion with The Silmarillion, and the bitter ending of the love of Lancelot and Guinevere, which was never written.*

The Fall of Arthur - paperback

HarperCollins, 2015. 1st edition. Paperback. Illustrated. The world first publication of a previously unknown work by J.R.R. Tolkien, which tells the extraordinary story of the final days of England's legendary hero, King Arthur.

The Fall of Arthur, the only venture by J.R.R. Tolkien into the legends of Arthur King of Britain, may well be regarded as his finest and most skilful achievement in the use of the Old English alliterative metre, in which he brought to his transforming perceptions of the old narratives a pervasive sense of the grave and fateful nature of all that is told: of Arthur's expedition overseas into distant heathen lands, of Guinevere's flight from Camelot, of the great sea-battle on Arthur's return to Britain, in the portrait of the traitor Mordred, in the tormented doubts of Lancelot in his French castle. Unhappily, The Fall of Arthur was one of several long narrative poems that he abandoned in that period. In this case he evidently began it in the earlier nineteen-thirties, and it was sufficiently advanced for him to send it to a very perceptive friend who read it with great enthusiasm at the end of 1934 and urgently pressed him 'You simply must finish it!' But in vain: he abandoned it, at some date unknown, though there is some evidence that it may have been in 1937, the year of the publication of The Hobbit and the first stirrings of The Lord of the Rings. Years later, in a letter of 1955, he said that 'he hoped to finish a long poem on The Fall of Arthur'; but that day never came. Associated with the text of the poem, however, are many manuscript pages: a great quantity of drafting and experimentation in verse, in which the strange evolution of the poem’s structure is revealed, together with narrative synopses and very significant if tantalising notes. In these latter can be discerned clear if mysterious associations of the Arthurian conclusion with The Silmarillion, and the bitter ending of the love of Lancelot and Guinevere, which was never written.*

Beowulf. HarC, 2014 (22/5)

A Translation and Commentary

HarperCollins, 2014. 1st edition. Hardback.

The translation of Beowulf by J.R.R. Tolkien was an early work, very distinctive in its mode, completed in 1926: he returned to it later to make hasty corrections, but seems never to have considered its publication.

This edition is twofold, for there exists an illuminating commentary on the text of the poem by the translator himself, in the written form of a series of lectures given at Oxford in the 1930s; and from these lectures a substantial selection has been made, to form also a commentary on the translation in this book.

From his creative attention to detail in these lectures there arises a sense of the immediacy and clarity of his vision. It is as if he entered into the imagined past: standing beside Beowulf and his men shaking out their mail-shirts as they beached their ship on the coast of Denmark, listening to the rising anger of Beowulf at the taunting of Unferth, or looking up in amazement at Grendel’s terrible hand set under the roof of Heorot.

But the commentary in this book includes also much from those lectures in which, while always anchored in the text, he expressed his wider perceptions. He looks closely at the dragon that would slay Beowulf ‘snuffling in baffled rage and injured greed when he discovers the theft of the cup’; but he rebuts the notion that this is ‘a mere treasure story’, ‘just another dragon tale’. He turns to the lines that tell of the burying of the golden things long ago, and observes that it is ‘the feeling for the treasure itself, this sad history’ that raises it to another level. ‘The whole thing is sombre, tragic, sinister, curiously real. The “treasure” is not just some lucky wealth that will enable the finder to have a good time, or marry the princess. It is laden with history, leading back into the dark heathen ages beyond the memory of song, but not beyond the reach of imagination.’

Sellic Spell, a ‘marvellous tale’, is a story written by Tolkien suggesting what might have been the form and style of an Old English folk-tale of Beowulf, in which there was no association with the ‘historical legends’ of the Northern kingdoms.*

Beowulf. HarC, 2015

A Translation and Commentary

HarperCollins, 20154. 1st edition. Paperback.

The translation of Beowulf by J.R.R. Tolkien was an early work, very distinctive in its mode, completed in 1926: he returned to it later to make hasty corrections, but seems never to have considered its publication.

This edition is twofold, for there exists an illuminating commentary on the text of the poem by the translator himself, in the written form of a series of lectures given at Oxford in the 1930s; and from these lectures a substantial selection has been made, to form also a commentary on the translation in this book.

From his creative attention to detail in these lectures there arises a sense of the immediacy and clarity of his vision. It is as if he entered into the imagined past: standing beside Beowulf and his men shaking out their mail-shirts as they beached their ship on the coast of Denmark, listening to the rising anger of Beowulf at the taunting of Unferth, or looking up in amazement at Grendel’s terrible hand set under the roof of Heorot.

But the commentary in this book includes also much from those lectures in which, while always anchored in the text, he expressed his wider perceptions. He looks closely at the dragon that would slay Beowulf ‘snuffling in baffled rage and injured greed when he discovers the theft of the cup’; but he rebuts the notion that this is ‘a mere treasure story’, ‘just another dragon tale’. He turns to the lines that tell of the burying of the golden things long ago, and observes that it is ‘the feeling for the treasure itself, this sad history’ that raises it to another level. ‘The whole thing is sombre, tragic, sinister, curiously real. The “treasure” is not just some lucky wealth that will enable the finder to have a good time, or marry the princess. It is laden with history, leading back into the dark heathen ages beyond the memory of song, but not beyond the reach of imagination.’

Sellic Spell, a ‘marvellous tale’, is a story written by Tolkien suggesting what might have been the form and style of an Old English folk-tale of Beowulf, in which there was no association with the ‘historical legends’ of the Northern kingdoms.*

Beowulf - de luxe edition

HarperCollins, 2014. 1st edition. Quarter-leather bound. In slipcase. Limited.

The translation of Beowulf by J.R.R. Tolkien was an early work, very distinctive in its mode, completed in 1926: he returned to it later to make hasty corrections, but seems never to have considered its publication.

This edition is twofold, for there exists an illuminating commentary on the text of the poem by the translator himself, in the written form of a series of lectures given at Oxford in the 1930s; and from these lectures a substantial selection has been made, to form also a commentary on the translation in this book.

From his creative attention to detail in these lectures there arises a sense of the immediacy and clarity of his vision. It is as if he entered into the imagined past: standing beside Beowulf and his men shaking out their mail-shirts as they beached their ship on the coast of Denmark, listening to the rising anger of Beowulf at the taunting of Unferth, or looking up in amazement at Grendel’s terrible hand set under the roof of Heorot.

But the commentary in this book includes also much from those lectures in which, while always anchored in the text, he expressed his wider perceptions. He looks closely at the dragon that would slay Beowulf ‘snuffling in baffled rage and injured greed when he discovers the theft of the cup’; but he rebuts the notion that this is ‘a mere treasure story’, ‘just another dragon tale’. He turns to the lines that tell of the burying of the golden things long ago, and observes that it is ‘the feeling for the treasure itself, this sad history’ that raises it to another level. ‘The whole thing is sombre, tragic, sinister, curiously real. The “treasure” is not just some lucky wealth that will enable the finder to have a good time, or marry the princess. It is laden with history, leading back into the dark heathen ages beyond the memory of song, but not beyond the reach of imagination.’

Sellic Spell, a ‘marvellous tale’, is a story written by Tolkien suggesting what might have been the form and style of an Old English folk-tale of Beowulf, in which there was no association with the ‘historical legends’ of the Northern kingdoms.*