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Mark T. Hooker, Tolkien and Welsh

Essays on JRR Tolkien's Use of Welsh in His Legendarium

Llyfrawr, 2012. 1st edition. Paperback. Illustrated. Signed by the author.

Tolkien and Welsh provides an overview of J.R.R.Tolkien's use of Welsh in his Legendarium, ranging from the obvious (Gwynfa), to the apparent (Took), to the veiled (Gerontius), to the hidden (Goldberry).

Though it is a book by a linguist, it was written for the non-linguist with the goal of making the topic accessible. The unavoidable jargon is explained in a glossary, and the narrative presents an overview of how Welsh influenced Tolkien's story line, as well as his synthetic languages Quenya and Sindarin.
The study is based on specific examples of attested names, placed in the context of their linguistic and cultural background, while highlighting the peculiar features of Welsh, "the senior language of the men of Britain" (MC 189), that Tolkien found so intriguing. It supplements, rather than competes with Carl Phelpstead’s excellent Tolkien and Wales, which sidestepped the topic of the Celtic linguistics behind Tolkien's work. Learn the story behind Lithe, Buckland, Anduin, and Baranduin.

Pagination: xxx + 274, B&W illustrations by James Dunning, maps, Index, Trade Paper

Jason Fisher--the editor of Tolkien and the Study of His Sources (McFarland, 2011), and the host of the blog 'Lingwë: Musings of a Fish' -- says:

Tolkien and Welsh "should be pretty accessible to most readers." Mark gets "into some of the particulars of Welsh (and Sindarin) phonology--especially on the matter of mutation, a prominent feature of both languages--but Mark writes primarily for the lay person." Where Carl Phelpstead's book Tolkien and Wales "presents a broad survey of the forest as a whole, Mark's book is down at the level of the trees within it, even single leaves, grappling with individual words and names. If you are familiar with his previous books, it is much like those, but with the driving thread being the influence of Welsh on Tolkien's nomenclature and storytelling. I think Mark's book and Carl's complement each other and could be profitably read together." *

Mark T. Hooker, Iter Tolkienensis

A Tolkiennymical Road Trip from Buckland (Worcestershire) to The Ivy Bush (Carmarthen, Wales)

Llyfrawr, 2016. 1st edition. Paperback. Illustrated. Signed by the author.

"a look at the meanings and stories of the place names that the route passes along the way, place names that might be translated or corruptions of those on the map of Middle-earth".*

Grant Hudson, The Hobbit Project Student Workbook

Clarendon House, 2012. 1st edition. Spiral bound.

The Hobbit Project is a structured course for 11-14 year olds. The best-selling children’s classic by J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit, is explored in terms of theme, character development and use of language. It is ideally suited for use in English lessons with whole class groups or with individual students and meets the requirements for Key Stage Three study as outlined by Cambridge University.*

Neil Isaacs and Rose Zimbardo (ed.), Tolkien and the Critics (1968)

Essays on JRR Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings
Notre Dame, 1968. 1st edition. Hardback. Collection of 15 essays on Tolkien, including "The Dethronement of Power" by C.S. Lewis, Edmund Fuller "The Lord of the Hobbits" and W.H. Auden "The Quest Hero". Antiquarian: very good condition (ex library copy. Sticker on spine dustjacket, notes in the margins).*

Neil Isaacs and Rose Zimbardo (ed.), Tolkien and the Critics (1969)

Essays on JRR Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings
Notre Dame, 1969. 1st edition as paperback. Collection of 15 essays on Tolkien, including "The Dethronement of Power" by C.S. Lewis, Edmund Fuller "The Lord of the Hobbits" and W.H. Auden "The Quest Hero". Antiquarian: very good condition (cover faded, notes in the margin).*

Neil Isaacs and Rose Zimbardo (ed.), Tolkien and the Critics (1970)

Essays on JRR Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings
Notre Dame, 1970. 3rd printing. Hardback. Collection of 15 essays on Tolkien, including "The Dethronement of Power" by C.S. Lewis, Edmund Fuller "The Lord of the Hobbits" and W.H. Auden "The Quest Hero". Antiquarian: very good condition (name covered on flyleaf, dustjacket missing).*

Kate Jones, Favourite Writers. Londen, 2000

Oversized paperback with short pieces, aimed at children, on popular authors, such as Terry Pratchett, J.K. Rowling and Roal Dahl. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis are also briefly discussed.

Leslie Ellen Jones, Myth and Middle-earth

Exploring the Legend Behind The Lord of the Rings

Cold Spring Harbor, 2002. 1st edition. Paperback.

Judd, Flora of Middle-earth

OUP, 2017. Ingebonden. Geïllustreerd.

The book considers the importance of plants in Tolkien's conception of Middle-earth. It develops the theme that Middle-earth is our own world - and will awaken the reader to the connection between the plants of Tolkien's legendarium and those growing in our gardens and local natural areas of the Northern Hemisphere. It also demonstrates the connection between the various plant communities of Middle-earth and the elven and human cultures that occupy them, including those environments degraded by warfare, industrialization or pollution.

The heart of the book is an alphabetical listing, arranged by common names, of all of the plants mentioned in Tolkien's legendarium; for each of these plants the treatment will include: 1) common and scientific name, along with an indication of the family to which the plant belongs, 2) a brief quote from one of Tolkien's works in which the plant is referenced, 3) a discussion of the significance of the plant in the context of Tolkien's legendarium, 4) the etymology relating to both English common name and the scientific name, and where relevant, the name in one or more of the languages of Middle-earth, 5) a brief statement of the plant's distribution and ecology (along with mention of major species), 6) economic uses, both traditional and current, and 7) an easy-to-understand description of the plant. The book provides guidelines to the use of plant descriptions, and the few technical terms used are carefully defined. Many plants are illustrated by original artwork, in the style of a woodcut print, and most are also represented by one to several photographs (showing their diagnostic characteristics). The description along with an identification key, when used with the illustrations and photos, allow easy identification of each plant, adding to the reader's understanding and appreciation of Tolkien's works. A glossary of descriptive terms is also included.*

Douglas Charles Kane, Arda Reconstructed

Lehigh University Press, 2009. 1st edition. Hardback. Illustrated.

In "Arda Reconstructed: The Creation of the Published Silmarillion", Douglas C. Kane reveals a tapestry woven by Christopher Tolkien from different portions of his father's work that is often quite mind-boggling, with inserts that seemed initially to have been editorial inventions shown to have come from some remote portion of Tolkien's vast body of work. He demonstrates how material that was written over the course of more than thirty years was merged together to create a single, coherent text. He also makes a frank appraisal of the material omitted by Christopher Tolkien (and in a couple of egregious cases the material invented by him) and how these omissions and insertions may have distorted his father's vision of what he considered - even more then "The Lord of the Rings" - to be his most important work. It is a fascinating portrait of a unique collaboration that reached beyond the grave.*

Clyde S. Kilby, A Well of Wonder

Essays on C.S. Lewis, JRR Tolkien, and the Inklings
Mount Tabor, 2016. 1st editon. Hardback. "offer brilliant introductions to the themes of the myth, theology, reason, and imagination that run through the fiction and prose from the renowned group of literary companions".*

Edouard J. Kloczko (ed.), Tolkien en France. Source Fantastique, 1998

Seven essays (like "L’épopée religieuse de J.R.R. Tolkien", "Smith of Wootton Major; un testament poétique" and "essai de microanalyse des Mewlips"), a bibiografie and a chronology. 1st edition. Paperback.

Paul H. Kocher, A Reader's Guide to The Silmarillion

Houghton Mifflin, 1980. 1st edition. Hardback. One of the first studies into The Silmarillion. Antiquarian: very good condition (spine slightly faded).*

Paul H. Kocher, A Reader's Guide to The Silmarillion (UK)

Thames and Hudson, 1980. 1st edition. Hardback. One of the first studies into The Silmarillion. Antiquarian: very good condition (spine slightly faded, small tear in dustjacket).*

Paul H. Kocher, Master of Middle-earth (HoM)

The Achievement of JRR Tolkien
HoughtonMifflin, 1972. 1st edition. Hardback. Photo of Tolkien on the cover. Antiquarian: very good condition*

Paul H. Kocher, Master of Middle-earth (Thames)

The Achievement of JRR Tolkien
Thames and Hudson, 1973. 1st edition. Hardback. Photo of Tolkien on the cover. Antiquarian: very good condition*

Paul H. Kocher, Master of Middle-earth

The Achievement of JRR Tolkien
Penguin, 1974. 1st edition as paperback. Photo of Tolkien on the cover. Antiquarian: very good condition*

Katie de Koster, Readings on J.R.R. Tolkien

San Diego, 2000

"This collection of abridged, previously published essays provides sophisticated analyses of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. The introductory essay presents solid biographical background on Tolkien. Tom Shippey's concluding essay, which identifies Tolkien's sources in developing Middle-earth, is perhaps the most useful in the collection. The editor also includes a thorough chronology of Tolkien's life, times, and work." 1st edition. Hardback (no dustjacket issued).

Katie de Koster, Readings on J.R.R. Tolkien (paperback)

San Diego, 2000

"This collection of abridged, previously published essays provides sophisticated analyses of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. The introductory essay presents solid biographical background on Tolkien. Tom Shippey's concluding essay, which identifies Tolkien's sources in developing Middle-earth, is perhaps the most useful in the collection. The editor also includes a thorough chronology of Tolkien's life, times, and work." 1st edition. Paperback.

Lee/Solopova, The Keys of Middle-earth

Discovering medieval literature through the fiction of JRR Tolkien

Palgrave, 2015. Second Edition. Hardback (no dustjacket issued).

A comprehensive introduction to the medieval languages and texts that inspired Tolkien's Middle-earth. Using key episodes in The Silmarillion, The Hobbit, and The Lord of the Rings, medieval texts are presented in their original language with translations. Essential for those who wish to delve deeper into the background to Tolkien's mythology.*

Lehoucq (ed.), The Science of Middle-earth

A New Understanding of Tolkien and His World

Pegasus, 2021. 1st edition. Hardback. Illustrated.

The world J.R.R. Tolkien created is one of the most beloved in all of literature, and continues to capture hearts and imaginations around the world.  From Oxford to ComiCon, Middle-earth is analyzed and interpreted through a multitude of perspectives.

But one essential facet of Tolkien and his Middle-earth has been overlooked: science.  This great writer, creator of worlds and unforgettable character, and inventor of language was also a scientific autodidact, with an innate interest and grasp of botany, paleontologist and geologist, with additional passions for archeology and chemistry.

Tolkien was an acute observer of flora and fauna and mined the minds of his scientific friends about ocean currents and volcanoes.  It is these layers science that give his imaginary universe—and the creatures and characters that inhabit it—such concreteness.  Within this gorgeously illustrated edition, a range of scientists—from astrophysicists to physicians, botanists to volcanologists—explore Tolkien’s novels, poems, and letters to reveal their fascinating scientific roots. 

A rewarding combination of literary exploration and scientific discovery, The Science of Middle Earth reveals the hidden meaning of the Ring’s corruption, why Hobbits have big feet, the origins of the Dwarves, the animals which inspired the dragons, and even whether or not an Ent is possible.

Enhanced by superb original drawings, this transportive work will delight both Tolkien fans and science lovers and inspire us to view both Middle Earth—and our own world—with fresh eyes. *

Janice Liedl, The Hobbit and History

The unofficial movie tie-in to The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies

Wiley, 2014. 1st edition. Paperback.

The Hobbit and History uncovers the parallels between the Middle Ages and the intricate culture of Middle-earth that Tolkien created in The Hobbit, showing how historical cultures provided the models for Tolkien’s characters, foods, riddles, and battle tactics. The book explores how European myths and legends inspired Tolkien’s wizards, dragons, and the monsters he created. Seeing Middle-earth and its peoples against these historical backdrops shines new light on the richness of Tolkien’s world, which is rooted in knowledge of European cultures as deep as the archive that Gandalf explores in Minas Tirith.

Filled with fascinating facts and reproductions of Tolkien’s original artwork of Smaug and other aspects of Middle-earth, The Hobbit and History is the missing piece for every book and movie fan and anyone who thought their J.R.R. Tolkien collection was complete.*

Jared Lobdell (ed), A Tolkien Compass (1975)

 

Open Court, 1975. 1st edition. Hardback. Eleven articles on Tolkien, plus Tolkien's "Guide to the Names in The Lord of the Rings". Antiquarian: very good condition (dustjacket missing, spine browned).

Can hobbits be psychoanalyzed? Does Tolkien’s Christianity shine through his imitations of pagan legends? Do his books offer a useful guide to everyday life? These and many more questions are addressed in the eleven chapters of this book. Contributors analyze Gollum’s character transformation, the psychological journey of Bilbo, the regime set up by Saruman at the end of Lord of the Rings and its parallels to fascism, the books’ narrative technique, and Tolkien’s rich use of myth and symbol. This is an insightful book that will appeal to both old and new Tolkien fans.

Jared Lobdell (ed), A Tolkien Compass (1980)

 

Ballantine, 1980. 1st edition thus. Paperback. Eleven articles on Tolkien, plus Tolkien's "Guide to the Names in The Lord of the Rings". Cover by Darrell Sweet. Antiquarian: good condition (inscriptions on first flyleaf, damage to the cover).

Can hobbits be psychoanalyzed? Does Tolkien’s Christianity shine through his imitations of pagan legends? Do his books offer a useful guide to everyday life? These and many more questions are addressed in the eleven chapters of this book. Contributors analyze Gollum’s character transformation, the psychological journey of Bilbo, the regime set up by Saruman at the end of Lord of the Rings and its parallels to fascism, the books’ narrative technique, and Tolkien’s rich use of myth and symbol. This is an insightful book that will appeal to both old and new Tolkien fans.*

Jared Lobdell (ed), A Tolkien Compass (2003)

Second Edition

Open Court, 2003. 1st edition thus. Paperback. Ten articles on Tolkien, with a new foreword by Tom Shippey and a new postscript by Jared Lobdell.

Can hobbits be psychoanalyzed? Does Tolkien’s Christianity shine through his imitations of pagan legends? Do his books offer a useful guide to everyday life? These and many more questions are addressed in the eleven chapters of this book. Contributors analyze Gollum’s character transformation, the psychological journey of Bilbo, the regime set up by Saruman at the end of Lord of the Rings and its parallels to fascism, the books’ narrative technique, and Tolkien’s rich use of myth and symbol. This is an insightful book that will appeal to both old and new Tolkien fans.*